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There have been some great days in films. Some truly inspiring, wonderful days that we rejoice over, as we watch on as our favourite characters revel in the beautiful perfection of a glorious day.

Conversely, there have been some terrible days. Horrid, destructive and upsetting days – that cause our protagonists anguish and distress and we thought it might be a good idea to look at some of the ‘Best Worst Days in Cinema’.

We’re counting down days that can be as emotionally disquieting as they can comedic or enjoyable. Either way, if our characters are having a bad time of it, then that’s good enough for us.

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10 – After Hours (1985)

You know that sinking feeling you get when you put your hands in your pocket to pull out some cash, only to discover you’ve lost it, or clumsily misplaced it somewhere? So you empty your belongings in the middle of the street in the desperate hope you’ll see the Queen’s face calmly smiling back at you with her reassuring “I’ve been here all along” expression smacked across her subtle grin, before realising that you have indeed lost your money. Well I don’t know about you, but that usually spells the end of the night – as a mishap that takes a while to overcome as you spend the rest of the evening smiling through gritted teeth.

Well, for Paul Hackett (Griffin Dunne) in Martin Scorsese’s After Hours, the aforementioned incident is merely the beginning of the worst night of his life. With the intention of meeting up with new love interest Marcy (Rosanna Arquette) who he had met earlier on in the day at a cafe – he ends up experiencing a series of misadventures, with burglars, suicides, punks and plaster – Paul has to experience all of the above with just spare change in his pocket. When he saw his $20 note slowly floating in the air, desperately out of reach, he should have just turned round and gone back home.

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