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Darren Aronofsky

In this new series of articles we look at six defining scenes from a director and the nominate the film which, we believe, best represents them as a filmmaker.

Welcome to Six Scenes and a Movie.

This weekend sees an unusual film opening in UK cinemas:  A fairly straight retelling of the story of Noah and the infamous biblical flood from the story in Genesis.  What makes this film even stranger is that it is adapted and directed by Darren Aronofsky, one of the most respected modern auteurs working out of Hollywood.

From his avant-garde monochrome and paranoid debut ?, through his ambitious triple-layered millennia-spanning love story The Fountain, to his most recent character study of a tortured ballerina in Black Swan – he has always managed to capture humanity and inner conflict within his protagonists.  Whether this manifests itself through drug addiction, profound regret or jealousy (and now the pressures of obeying a vengeful deity), he has used style and subtlety to create really memorable scenes…

 

SCENE ONE: Intro – ?

One of the first rules of film analysis is to closely consider how a character is first introduced into a narrative, so with that in mind I felt it necessary to reconsider how Aronofsky first introduced himself into the film business.  His first film ? was such a bold debut, with such a powerful credit sequence that he grabs our attention within seconds.

The brash typography and harsh synth sounds fuzz on to the screens before a hellish drum and bass loop ignites images of brain synapses and mathematical iconography.  I can only imagine how exciting it must have been when it premiered at Sundance in 1998 (where it won Aronofsky the directing prize).

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