Prev1 of 6
Click Next or Swipe on Mobile

Few things define America better than McDonald’s. The cultural icon and hard–to-resist fast food joint’s success is the pinnacle of capitalism, corporate globalisation, and marketing.

Once a humble drive-in, founded by two brothers in 1940s California, the global behemoth dominates the market with a chain of restaurants that stretch across more than 100 countries and towers as one of the few remaining triumphs that keep the American Dream alive.

Over the years McDonald’s has appeared in numerous movies and embraced popular culture with Happy Meal toys and partnerships with major studios. But it’s not always been about marketing and product placement. Documentaries have exposed the shocking truths hidden behind-the-scenes, feature films have used it as a symbol of capitalist greed, and others simply as a tool to ground their film in a reality their audience are familiar with.

For the first time, McDonald’s itself will be the direct focus of a mainstream movie as John Lee Hancock’s The Founder reveals the story of how it all began. But before we discover how McDonald’s was founded, whet your appetite by looking back at the best moments where the Big Mac appeared on the big screen.

  1. Big Daddy

We’ve all been there: rushing to get the breakfast menu before the deadline only to find out the cut-off time has changed.

This is the latest in a long line of predicaments that beset 32-year-old bachelor Sonny Koufax on the morning after his housemate’s five-year-old son Julian was abandoned at his apartment. Taking advantage of this unique opportunity to prove himself as an adult, and win back the heart of his ex-girlfriend Vanessa, Sonny reluctantly takes care of the infant.

After a sleepless night of bed-wetting and story-telling, Sonny has to feed Julian so decides to hurry the several blocks to McDonald’s to get breakfast before the 11am cut-off.  Along the way, they stop to take a pee beside a fancy restaurant (in the shot that would become the iconic artwork of the movie) and are derailed by the obligatory Steve Buscemi cameo. When he finally arrives, and after struggling through another patience-testing conversation with Julian; who adorably asks for “Cheewios”, Sonny discovers the cut-off time is actually 10:30, not 11. Sonny launches into a sweary tirade and throws a perfect stranger’s fries over his shoulder.

His outburst doesn’t match the fury of Michael Douglas in Falling Down, who misses Whammyburger’s breakfast deadline by three minutes and demands the manager makes an exception by gunpoint.

Prev1 of 6
Click Next or Swipe on Mobile