Exclusive Set Pics and Video Footage from the Captain America Set

Exclusive Set Pics and Video Footage from the Captain America Set

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You may remember last year that I paid a visit to the Robin Hood set in Surrey and I managed to get rather a lot of footage of the village and Castle. After seeing the 4 images that The Media Club posted earlier today, I thought it was only right that I go off and visit the ‘Frostbite’ (aka Captain America: The First Avenger) set and collect some photos and footage.

Unfortunately filming of Joe Johnston’s latest took place last week on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Much of what was there has been dismantled and taken away. What remained was one Sherman tank, around 30 Army tents, a Band Stand with USO written above it, which suggests the plot point described by director Joe Johnston that Steve Rogers is forced into the USO circuit has made it into the final film.

Hidden on stage, for the keen eyed viewer, was the American Army seal (at least I think that’s what it is!), which if you look closely you can see in my video below.

After chatting with a security guard we managed to find out that during filming there were at least 2 Sherman tanks, multiple jeeps, loads of old fashioned cars and various other armoured personnel carriers.

We took this video (if you’re in the US, use the video below the YouTube version) and quite a number of photos before being moved on! Hope you enjoy the video, click the photos to enlarge.

If you’re in the US and can’t see the video above, try this version:


David Sztypuljak is the Co-Founder and Editor of HeyUGuys. He loves all things movies, often even the terrible films that others hate!
  • Shundai001

    NATO was created AFTER WWII.

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    All socks will lose elasticity at the top and often folding them down over the top of the boot is necessary to stop them sliding inside the boot as you walk. Despite this fact, you should still try to buy socks which will not lose their elasticity too quickly.
    Hiking socks are not cheap and you can expect to pay $10 a pair, or more, for a decent pair. Nevertheless, this is one investment that, like your hiking boots, is well worth the cost and you should arm yourself with at least three or pairs of hiking socks and always carry at least one spare pair with you in your backpack.
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